Steinunn Agnarsdóttir wearing Trelise Cooper by Aaron VIII
Steinunn Agnarsdóttir wearing Aje, Trelise Cooper & Reliquia by Aaron VIII
Steinunn Agnarsdóttir wearing Aje, Trelise Cooper & Reliquia by Aaron VIII
Steinunn Agnarsdóttir wearing Aje, Trelise Cooper & Reliquia by Aaron VIII
Steinunn Agnarsdóttir wearing Aje, Trelise Cooper & Reliquia by Aaron VIII
Steinunn Agnarsdóttir by Aaron VIII
Steinunn Agnarsdóttir by Aaron VIII
Steinunn Agnarsdóttir wearing Aje, Trelise Cooper & Reliquia by Aaron VIII
Steinunn Agnarsdóttir wearing Aje, Trelise Cooper & Reliquia by Aaron VIII
Steinunn Agnarsdóttir wearing Trelise Cooper by Aaron VIII
Steinunn Agnarsdóttir wearing Aje, Trelise Cooper & Reliquia by Aaron VIII
Steinunn Agnarsdóttir by Aaron VIII

Stravinsky’s Riot

Base-Cast
June 2020

The year was 1913. Russian composer Igor Stravinsky debuted his revolutionary ballet The Rite of Spring at Théâtre des Champs-Élysées in Paris. The audience, accustomed to conventional ballets were shocked by the discordant notes, sharp, unnatural choreography and Pagan imagery, and began to boo within the first minutes of the piece. Things escalated before the piece reached halfway, with brawls breaking out in between those in favour of the work and who were offended by this sacrilege to ballet. Police arrived during the intermission but were unable to keep the audience under control, and a full scale riot ensued. Stravinsky was so shocked by the audience reaction that he fled the theatre before the show was over.

One notable member of the audience however, was fascinated by Stravinsky’s work. Her name: Coco Chanel. Years later during the love affair between Chanel and Stravinsky came the inspiration for her iconic scent No. 5, and Stravinsky was finally recognised as a genius who changed the future of ballet.